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General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962

In 1962, General Motors presented two experimental sports cars design studies that were fully operational but not intended for production. The Corvair Monza GT and SS were based on the production Corvair and were prepared jointly by the GM Styling Staff and the Chevrolet Division. The Corvair Monza GT and SS retain the 2375 cc. flat six  engine of the production Chevrolet Corvair compact sedan, producing 103 hp at 4400 rpm and 18,53 mkg torque at 2800rpm. The transmission is fully synchronised 4-Speed Synchro-Mesh, and the clutch is hydraulically actuated. The propulsion pack is mounted in front of the rear axle in mid-engine position for the Corvair Monza GT. The Corvair SS Spyder has its engine-transmission behind the rear axle like in the production Corvair. On the Corvair Monza GT the position of the power unit allows excellent weight distribution. Engine cooling air enters through dual grilles ahead of each rear wheels. Tires are 6.00/6.50 x13 at the rear and 5.20x13 in front. Wheels are cast light alloy metal and feature full disc brakes. The carefully tuned dual exhaust system with outlets behind each rear wheel includes a swivelling feature to accommodate the hinged rear body section. Forward mounted fuel tank features a large quick fill cap just ahead of the windshield canopy. Body structure is formed of special glass fibre reinforced plastic panels fitted to a unique metal cradle assembly, resulting in an overall unit that is low in weight yet exceptionally rigid. Wheelbase is 92 in (2340 mm)., overall length 165 in. (4200mm), width 62 in.(1575mm) and height 42 in. (1070 mm) only. The Corvair Monza SS Spyder had the same overall length but the wheelbase was shorter at 88,2 in (2240 mm) because of different power plant implementation.
The body styling was developed in wind tunnel for streamlined aerodynamically optimized shape. The styling design was conceived by Larry Shinoda and Tony Lapine under the Direction of Bill Mitchell. Both the Corvair Monza GT and SS Spyder have steeply reclined contour seats with the seat-back at 45° angle and adjustable cushioned headrests. The seats are fixed and integrated in the platform. Adjustment of the driving position is made by steering wheel position and foot pedal holder setting. Steering wheel has a unique hub design that allows it to be removed entirely to facilitate entry and exit. Forward visibility is virtually unlimited through pillar-less canopy, which is painted on the top to reduce glare. Instrument panel finish is dull black-crackle for freedom from reflections. Functional instrumentation includes a large tachometer and speedometer plus gauges for oil pressure, fuel supply status, and engine temperature.
Headlights are controlled by pushbuttons. Headlights are hidden behind alligator type covers that follow the striking contours of the front end. Such alligator covers will no doubt offer wind resistance and impact forward visibility when open; the headlights of the SS Spyder use Plexyglass covers that are more practical and more simple. There are other controls on the convenient center console, including parking brake, horn button, gearshift, and louver operating lever
The Corvair Monza GT styling from the rear is highlighted by crisply sculptured contours, deeply concaved panel housing a recessed license plate and multiple taillight units, and novel adjustable louvers instead of a conventional rear window.

Louvers position is regulated by a lever on the central console between the seats. Twin side mirrors permit rearview visibility. Open louvers permit maximum ventilation and visibility, and overlap slightly to help shield the Monza GT interior from rain and extreme sunlight.
The access to the Corvair Monza GT is by the swinging forward of the unique panoramic canopy on counterbalanced hinges. For servicing, the entire rear body section pivots up to expose all major components of the power-plant and drive system. The pillar-less canopy, when closed, is locked on the roll bar behind the seats.
The Corvair Monza GT and SS were experimental vehicles and styling studies that allowed evaluate public acceptance on new technical and stylistic solutions. It provided designers with more liberty to create new shapes and dream cars that attract visibility for the Company. They are an exhibit of the striking styling trends for sports cars at the time.

wallpapers of the General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 (click on image to enlarge)

General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962
General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962
General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962   General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962 General Motors - Chevrolet Experimental Corvair Monza GT and SS 1962

 

 

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